Sep 092014
 

I confess I have never been enamored with the Capsule Wardrobe concept. Perhaps now that I don’t have to expend my entire allotment of clothing creativity on myself it will start to make more sense.

At any rate, for what it’s worth, here’s what I’m thinking now, the result of combining my original thoughts about wardrobe development with the costume design process and my in-process personal stylist training:

for each bottom needed, choose two layers that coordinate. For each bottom/layer combination, choose two different tops.

Definitions:

  • bottom: pant or skirt
  • layer: jacket or sweater; “third piece”
  • top: blouse, tee, or whatever covers your nakedness on top

After all the pieces are in place, try on each combination of bottom, top, and layer; choose shoes and accessories. Take pictures. Make notes. Hang the pieces together in your closet, if necessary.

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Packing my exercise clothes in the Ziploc bags is working well so far. Now all I need is to find some pants that fit over my calves and I can get my every day fall wardrobe streamlined as well. Automate is the new delegate! ๐Ÿ˜‰

  7 Responses to “Grow your wardrobe like a tree”

  1. Okay, so let me get this straight. This is preplanning outfits, right? For each bottom, I have two possibilities of outfits – by varying the top half? (Okay – I see the tree reference now).

    I’m starting to plan my fall wardrobe, and might give this a try. In summer I had just barely more tops than bottoms, but all of the mixed and matched well. I’m feeling like I have too many fall options, and need to pick my favorites and purge or store the rest. Too many options make getting dressed hard for me.

  2. I think you would have four options for each bottom, two tops per layering piece. This would work for me because it suits my uniform. What about ladies who prefer dresses? I suppose they can take a more simplified approach.

  3. I am with you on the confusion caused by too many options (may be the J?). And I think the concept you had for summer is as good, maybe better, compared to what I am suggesting. I did a personal shopping this week and my friend/client got all stuff that worked together really well. I am not there. ๐Ÿ™‚

    As I was envisioning it, this would give 4 options for each bottom: bottom 1+ layer 1 + top 1, bottom 1+ layer 1 + top 2, bottom 1+ layer 2 + top 3, bottom 1+ layer 2 + top 4. If all the tops went with each of the bottoms and each of the layers, there would be alot! But, for me, when I get to the thought of everything going together, I just start to like some of the combinations or some of the pieces better, and then it is too complicated.

    Another spin on this, if the proportions could be managed, would be to have an interchangeable skirt and pant for each pair of layers.

    Right after I posted this, I went to the grocery store. One of our closest stores is an “everything” type store; I buy my socks and underwear there, but rarely any clothes. Since I have been wearing myself out shopping for pants, I decided to look. Found two pairs ($35 for the two): a dark slim jean and a dark green, lightweight corduroy.

    I will be able to start my own process as soon as I get them washed (and maybe shortened). ๐Ÿ™‚

  4. Dresses are even simpler! But they are pretty much a one-look thing. I like to use them for summer, but I got kinda tired of my options by the end. A very basic dress could be changed up with accessories, especially for people who use scarves. ๐Ÿ™‚

  5. Update: the day after I posted this, it was helpful. Somehow it inverted my thought process; instead of choosing a top, then pants to go with, and finally,the layer; I chose my pants first, then the layer, and, finally, the top. I came up with an outfit that I never would have the other way, but it was great. ๐Ÿ™‚

  6. […] tops (100% of 10 is 10, divided by 1.25 = 8). If I were using 100% separates, working back down the Grow Like a Tree method I would have 8 tops, 4 layers, and 2 bottoms; a total 14 piece wardrobe. If I make all the […]

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