Feb 172015
 

Since the early days of this blog, I have advocated a concept I called the uniform template. Basically, it is a formula of pieces which create a look you feel comfortable wearing in a given season and lifestyle segment. for example, I used the following templates last summer (illustration):

Leisure – shorts and sandals + tee + blazer
Casual – dress and summery flats
Active – yoga pants plus sleeveless top

Recently, I began to doubt the concept. Is it a little bit boring to repeat the same formula every day? I doubted until I began exploring the minimalist wardrobe-building material at Into Mind. What I call uniform template, she calls proportion. And it was the use of that particular word that made me realize the brilliance of the idea.

One of the more complicated elements in an outfit is the proportions. And it is a big deal! Once you have a really great outfit design, doesn’t it make sense to replicate it, rather than starting over from scratch? Using different colors, fabrics, and accessories will create enough variety that you will not look like you are wearing the same thing – a uniform.

I have reached a couple of conclusions on this topic –

  1. I think I like the idea of changing the vocabulary from “uniform template” to “proportion template”. Like? Or perhaps there is an even better alternative.
  2. I want to offer this, the creation of a personalized proportion template, as an add-on service to the Style Line Analysis.

What I would do: starting with the base you like to use (bottom and shoes), for the particular lifestyle segment, I would design a proportion template for your unique body type including the shape of the skirt or pants, how long the top should be, placement of the belt, etc.

Feb 032015
 

The foundational first step in most of what I do is something I am calling the Style Line Analysis. Without it, I could look at the clothes in your closet and have little to no idea whether they would suit you are not. With it (and your measurements), I could pretty much do your shopping for you while you did something else. 🙂

So what is a Style Line Analysis? Basically, it covers the big considerations in putting together an outfit: shape and proportion. From a photo or in-person consultation, I identify your silhouette and proportion considerations; then, give you insight into techniques for creating balance and harmony with your clothes.

In my Spokane personal style consultancy, I require the Style Line Analysis before I do a Closet Consultation or any personal shopping; however, it is also available remotely via email. Introductory pricing for this service is only $45 – less than you were going to spend on clothes this month – 😉 why not hit the pause button and get some clarity first? I can only offer 10 of these this month, so email me today to get on the calendar: rebecca (at) between my peers (dot) com.

If the idea of hiring a personal style consultant still seems strange to you, you may appreciate this post Bridgette Raes wrote last year: What You Need to Know Before You Hire a Fashion Stylist.

Jan 272015
 

Now that I have completed my training as a Personal Stylist, I’d like to put up some posts explaining what it is I do. Spokane readers can reach me at rebecca@betweenmypeers.com to inquire about Color Analysis and Closet Consultations. Most other services are available via email.

About Color Analysis: The system I use has 16 palettes based on temperature, value, and resonance. From those 16 palettes, I can add or subtract individual sticks to create a completely custom color harmony. Your unique palette supports your coloring and your personality.

IMG_3538.JPGHere is mine, a mix of warm and cool, plenty of light color values and a few darks, primarily tinted and saturated, straightforward hues.

I realize Color Analysis is a complicated and somewhat controversial topic. I not here to disparage any other system; I just love this one! Fine print: the swatches are custom-made to order, so there is delivery time, and I have you do a little bit of homework ahead of time. 🙂