Feb 272017
 

As promised, I have simplified my offerings. View the new price sheet: Spring 2017 Style Discovery Pricing. This actually does not represent a price increase, just consolidation of services, but I do expect prices to go up later this year. In the meantime, I just can’t stop trying to think of ways to make this life-changing information available to everyone.

If you can’t get to Spokane or you can’t afford to do anything right now, do this: start scanning the world for beauty.  Do the following exercise for your own benefit.

The “homework” for the Essential Color Palette Discovery: collect between six and ten images you find compellingly beautiful from an aesthetic, as opposed to sentimental, standpoint. These can be landscapes, interiors, animals, art, or anything else other than clothes. Invite me to view these on Pinterest or in a Facebook album, or simply email the images or links to me several days prior to our appointment.

Pictured, a snippet of mine.

Oct 162015
 
After

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Before

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In her own words, 4+ months after her Style Lines Analysis:

“Rebecca, I know I told you about the documentary Iris, but you MUST MUST MUST check out the documentary Advanced Style. It’s all about a bunch of geezer women in NY who have become flamboyant dressers! It’s very inspirational… There is also a blog by the same guy! I’m telling you, I’m looking forward to old age now and I wasn’t before!

Thank you for the basics. I couldn’t be doing this without that… I know what I’m looking for now, when I go shopping! I was lost before. Now it’s so much fun being creative! I have to tell you I needed both. Your advice and the inspiration from these creative, artistic women!!

Every day has become a fashion show!! My husband loves it and he is my consultant!

Love,

Anita”

Would you like to show more personality in your look without spending your life shopping? Perhaps the Style Lines Analysis is the boost you need! For under $100 American, you can learn the basics about your best clothing shapes and proportions. Contact me for instructions on how to order.

Jun 042015
 

What I mean by the question “are you a builder or an editor?” is

  • Are you the type of person who buys alot of clothes, but needs help knowing what to keep and what to toss (and maybe how to put it together)? If so, you may be a builder.
  • OR

  • Is it easy for you to see what isn’t working and get rid of it, except for the fact that eventually you would be left with nothing to wear? If this is you, you may be an editor.

Lately I have been thinking about the best place for my clients to start in their process of discovering their signature style. One school of thought would be to start with the color analysis, which begins with a consultation in my home studio after which the individualized palette is made in California and shipped to the client. This starting point very much fits the editor, the minimalist, and the individual with a strong sense of what shapes and styles she likes to wear – almost a uniform, so to speak.

Knowing what styles I would recommend is mentioned by about half of people who express interest in image consulting services. Usually these ladies have larger wardrobes. Is it too great a leap to draw the conclusion that a builder may want to start with a closet consultation? My initial closet consultations include a style line analysis.

Obviously (or perhaps not), both of these services necessitate us being in the same space physically. For distance clients, though, just the style line analysis provides 126 gallons (the hero recently discovered in an old, old engineering manual the unit of measurement “butt” – so, a “buttload” is not what you think) of valuable information about the shapes and proportions that work best for you. Now, thanks to a suggestion from a lovely client, I will also include a brief follow-up call. Because, truthfully, the style line analysis is alot of technical information to absorb.

If you could have one free service, which would you choose? Btw, have you heard of eshakti? I know regular readers of this blog have, but I have been surprised how many of my friends and acquaintances irl haven’t. Register now and get $25 OFF your first order. Free Customization of your first order!

Apr 172015
 

So, I have been having a ball, but also wearing myself out – in a good way. Alot is going on behind the scenes. As I have been working my tail off this week, I have also been thinking – the hero says that is my greatest strength 😉 – especially about how I can be most helpful.

One conclusion: There are some categories of high-value items that I seem to have a skill for finding, like fun leather jackets and cashmere sweaters; I may think of some others. In addition to continuing to offer coordinated outfits, I will start posting some of those items too. You might as well benefit from my finds.

(I know it is not sweater season, but it will be again. Did you know you can put your sweaters in the freezer to keep the moths out? And I wash my cashmere sweaters all the time – just don’t dry them.)

Eventually, I would love to offer mini-capsule wardrobes. Do you think that would be helpful?

Mar 232015
 

On the Entreleadership podcast today, one of the featured interviews was with Bob Burg, author of The Go-Giver. When I heard the following list, I hit pause, rewound, and made note.

Five elements of value

  1. Excellence
  2. Consistency
  3. Attention
  4. Empathy
  5. Appreciation

Chewing on this, it occurred to me that these elements, or their lack, probably constitute the primary reasons women don’t seek help with their looks. Remember when I had my virtual makeover? I was sincerely surprised that Carla Mathis (one of the premier image masters in the world) and Erin Mathis (another highly-skilled stylist) were able to suggest anything to which I connected. But they did. I value empathy. What I didn’t expect was for anyone to understand what it was like to be me enough to suggest what I should wear. 

Since beginning this journey from homeschool mom to blogger to personal stylist, I have become aware that many women don’t value, or understand, how a stylist can help. I didn’t get it either. But now, almost everyday, I see women beginning to experience more fun and less hassle with their clothes.
What qualities would you particularly value in the person you trust to help you with your look?


Mar 052015
 

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Yesterday I got my hair cut. After studying a multitude of factors impacting hairstyle, doing some hairstyle design consultations for clients, and getting the expert input from My Virtual Makeover (for which my hair is not yet long enough), I finally stopped long enough to crank through the considerations myself. It took the better part of two days.

ALOT goes into hairstyle design. It is informed by each of my Essential Series of services.

Although it is only my second day with the haircut, I believe it is both more complicated and more flattering than what I would have come up with using the standard methods: asking a hairstylist or looking on Pinterest. Which, btw, I am finally on Pinterest (@rebeccamielke). 🙂

Feb 242015
 

Are you an accessories person? In my Essential Series of style services, I offer a Facial Themes Analysis to help with selecting accessories and defining the best prints. This image consulting service is available via email to clients in Spokane and around the world.

But you might be wondering, “What is a Facial Themes Analysis”? That’s reasonable. Using a photograph, I trace your face and then look for patterns. image. Repeating those patterns in your accessories will enhance your natural beauty. I also identify the scale of your features, and other artistic elements relating to necklines, accessories, and prints.

In this photo, shamelessly lifted from YouTube, you see a beautiful woman enhancing the triangle shapes in her face (see her lower eyelid?) with her v-neckline and her side bangs. Analyzing your face for line and shape is difficult, but ever-so-valuable in selecting the details you wear near it.

Feb 172015
 

Since the early days of this blog, I have advocated a concept I called the uniform template. Basically, it is a formula of pieces which create a look you feel comfortable wearing in a given season and lifestyle segment. for example, I used the following templates last summer (illustration):

Leisure – shorts and sandals + tee + blazer
Casual – dress and summery flats
Active – yoga pants plus sleeveless top

Recently, I began to doubt the concept. Is it a little bit boring to repeat the same formula every day? I doubted until I began exploring the minimalist wardrobe-building material at Into Mind. What I call uniform template, she calls proportion. And it was the use of that particular word that made me realize the brilliance of the idea.

One of the more complicated elements in an outfit is the proportions. And it is a big deal! Once you have a really great outfit design, doesn’t it make sense to replicate it, rather than starting over from scratch? Using different colors, fabrics, and accessories will create enough variety that you will not look like you are wearing the same thing – a uniform.

I have reached a couple of conclusions on this topic –

  1. I think I like the idea of changing the vocabulary from “uniform template” to “proportion template”. Like? Or perhaps there is an even better alternative.
  2. I want to offer this, the creation of a personalized proportion template, as an add-on service to the Style Line Analysis.

What I would do: starting with the base you like to use (bottom and shoes), for the particular lifestyle segment, I would design a proportion template for your unique body type including the shape of the skirt or pants, how long the top should be, placement of the belt, etc.

Feb 032015
 

The foundational first step in most of what I do is something I am calling the Style Line Analysis. Without it, I could look at the clothes in your closet and have little to no idea whether they would suit you are not. With it (and your measurements), I could pretty much do your shopping for you while you did something else. 🙂

So what is a Style Line Analysis? Basically, it covers the big considerations in putting together an outfit: shape and proportion. From a photo or in-person consultation, I identify your silhouette and proportion considerations; then, give you insight into techniques for creating balance and harmony with your clothes.

In my Spokane personal style consultancy, I require the Style Line Analysis before I do a Closet Consultation or any personal shopping; however, it is also available remotely via email. Introductory pricing for this service is only $45 – less than you were going to spend on clothes this month – 😉 why not hit the pause button and get some clarity first? I can only offer 10 of these this month, so email me today to get on the calendar: rebecca (at) between my peers (dot) com.

If the idea of hiring a personal style consultant still seems strange to you, you may appreciate this post Bridgette Raes wrote last year: What You Need to Know Before You Hire a Fashion Stylist.